Eastern Spirituality

 

Who Am I?: this is the basic question we all ask ourselves sooner or later. This article gives an answer based on Tibetan Buddhism.

The Integral Yoga: a summary from the book by Sri Aurobindo, in which he explains in detail the process of meditation, and the attainment of the spiritual, divine awareness. Aurobindo extensively studied many yogic traditions, but writes primarily from his own experience.

Dzogchen, The Great Perfection: an ancient but direct way of discovering and realizing the natural, primordial state or natural condition of every sentient being. Dzogchen is considered the highest teaching and practice in Tibetan Buddhism. Its fundamental tenet is that reality, including the individual, is already complete and perfect, that nothing needs to be transformed (as in tantra) or renounced (as in sutra) but only recognized for what it truly is. The essential dzogchen practice is “self-liberation”; allowing all that arises in experience to exist just as it is, without elaboration by the conceptual mind, without grasping or aversion.

Chakras, A Guide to Understanding Your Power: An extensive and informative description of the seven traditional chakras based on Eastern and Western interpretations.

Tantra Cosmology: This article is an overview of Tantra cosmology: the emanation, creation and structure of the divine, the universe and man. Siva, Shakti, the Gunas, the Tattwas, Kundalini, the Lingas.

The Doctrine of Vibration: A summary of the book The Doctrine of Vibration, which explains the Tantra of Kashmir Shavaism. Basically it is about the nature and essence of all things and beings, and the realization and liberation of our own divine essence.

Ziarat: This book is a record of a Western person’s travel through eastern Europe, the Middle east and India, while visiting Islamic living saints, fakirs, dervishes and other people with spiritual power. He also visited many tombs of similar people who have left this physical world, whose graves are still exuding strong spiritual energies.

Hsin Hsin Ming: you want to be enlightened? Here is how to do it. The Hsin Hsin Ming is an ancient Chinese text explaining clearly what the right attitude is to bring forth the divine. You may want to read it more than once.

Om Ah Hum: “Om Ah Hum”  is a well-known Buddhist mantra, but what does it mean? It is a mantra that functions on many levels. The following is a basic explanation.

Wealth and Power in Buddhism? : Gautama Buddha, the historical Buddha left his palace and all his wealth behind. Buddhist monasteries seem to do just the opposite.

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